New multiple myeloma therapy shows promise in preclinical study

New multiple myeloma therapy shows promise in preclinical study

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style | August 07, 2020 Molecular Imaging

While 212Pb monoclonal antibodies effectively inhibited tumor growth and increased survival, whole-body SPECT/CT imaging was not possible due to the low 212Pb activity injected and the detection sensitivity. Instead, researchers performed SPECT/CT imaging with 203Pb, a chemically identical radiometal.

“This radioelement allowed us to consider a theranostic approach for 212Pb α-radioimmunotherapy, preventing the need for a radionuclide with different physical–chemical properties that would likely result in different pharmacokinetics. Combining therapy and imaging could provide an effective approach to optimizing therapeutic doses using specific dosimetry calculation and to monitoring the patient’s response. Moving forward, this could be considered as an innovative theranostic approach,” noted Michel Cogné, MD, PhD, professor of immunology at Limoges Medical School in Limoges, France.

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The authors of “212Pb α-Radioimmunotherapy Targeting CD38 in Multiple Myeloma: A Preclinical Study” include Isabelle Quelven and Jacques Monteil, Nuclear Medicine Department, Limoges University Hospital, Limoges, France, and CNRS-UMR7276, INSERM U1262, Contrôle de la Réponse Immune B et Lymphoproliférations, Limoges University, Limoges, France; Audrey Bayout, Nuclear Medicine Department, Limoges University Hospital, Limoges, France; Magali Sage, Jérémy Mounier, Julie Garrier, Michel Cogné and Stéphanie Durand-Panteix, CNRS-UMR7276, INSERM U1262, Contrôle de la Réponse Immune B et Lymphoproliférations, Limoges University, Limoges, France; and Amal Saidi, Orano Med SAS, Paris, France.


About the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) is the world’s leading nuclear medicine, molecular imaging and theranostics journal, accessed close to 10 million times each year by practitioners around the globe, providing them with the information they need to advance this rapidly expanding field.

JNM is published by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to advancing nuclear medicine and molecular imaging—precision medicine that allows diagnosis and treatment to be tailored to individual patients in order to achieve the best possible outcomes.

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