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Cardiology Homepage

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The Emory Cardiac Toolbox on display
at SNMMI

GE launched Syntermed's Emory Cardiac Toolbox at SNMMI

par Lauren Dubinsky , Senior Reporter
GE Healthcare announced Sunday at the SNMMI annual meeting that Syntermed's Emory Cardiac Toolbox is now available through GE Healthcare Life Sciences.

“We partnered with Syntermed with the idea of bringing software into the market that helps customers with older gamma cameras become up-to-date in terms of software,” Matthew Morrison, product manager for nuclear cardiology for GE Healthcare Life Sciences, told HCB News.

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Historically, nuclear imaging departments are stuck with the version of software that comes with the SPECT system they purchase. The average age of SPECT systems at U.S. nuclear cardiology labs was 8.2 years in 2011, according to a survey from the University of Missouri. These cameras can cost several hundred thousand dollars, an amount many facilities are not willing to pay.

“They are not looking to totally change the equipment but are probably starting to feel like they are behind in terms of software,” said Morrison.

With the Emory toolbox, users pay an annual license fee to secure immediate updates in software as new features become available.

As part of the partnership, GE has optimized Syntermed’s software for the company’s Myoview cardiac imaging agent, enabling Myoview customers to leverage the Emory toolbox to compare the patient’s heart with subject data that uses different tracers.

In addition, the solution allows users to read and report remotely from a standard PC or laptop, eliminating the need for the facility to invest in a workstation.

“What customers like is the web-enabled component because that’s the way we operate in our private lives,” said Morrison. “It’s sort of the expectation to access stuff easily through your web browser instead of going down the hallway to an office with a dedicated workstation.”

Optional imaging decision support is also available with the Syntermed IDS tool, helping the cardiologist identify the defect and make comparisons to surrounding healthy heart tissue.

“If you’re in a small nuclear cardiology office, then maybe you’re the only cardiology specialist – this is like having someone helping you by telling you where to look,” said Morrison.

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