Follow-up study suggests brain stents are safe and effective for reducing recurrent stroke risk

Follow-up study suggests brain stents are safe and effective for reducing recurrent stroke risk

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style | February 21, 2020 Cardiology Stroke
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 20, 2020 — A brain stent appears safe and effective for reducing the risk of recurrent stroke in patients with cholesterol-clogged brain arteries, according to late breaking science presented today at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020. The conference, Feb. 19-21 in Los Angeles, is a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science of stroke and brain health.

A previous study, the WEAVE trial, showed a low 2.6% stroke and death rate within the first few days of the procedure in patients received the Wingspan stent for intracranial atherosclerotic disease. The current study yielded a long-term 8.5% total one-year stroke and death rate.

“This trial is unique because prior studies included off-label patients. This is the largest intracranial stent trial for atherosclerotic disease performed according to the FDA indication for the Wingspan stent,” said Michael J. Alexander, M.D., professor and vice chairman of neurosurgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. “The stroke and death rates were substantially lower than the one-year rate of 20% in the stenting arm of the SAMMPRIS trial and slightly better than the 12.2% stroke and death rate in the medical arm of SAMMPRIS.”

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The current study – Wingspan One-year Vascular Imaging, Events and Neurologic Outcomes, known as WOVEN – is the largest on-label, intracranial stenting trial to-date with long-term follow-up. Intracranial stents are mesh tubes that act as permanent implants to open clogged brain arteries, which improve blood in flow to the brain.

WOVEN – conducted at 16 U.S. centers – followed 152 patients who were treated with the self-expanding Wingspan stent from the WEAVE trial according to the FDA guidelines for use. Data on subsequent strokes and deaths were collected, and follow-up imaging assessed possible reclogging of the stent.

“The long-term results of the WOVEN study are important to determine if safer stenting practices and lower complication rates from the treatment itself resulted in improved patient outcomes at one-year,” Alexander said. “Intracranial stenting could provide an alternative

when medical therapy and other treatments have been unsuccessful.”

These results will likely lead to a randomized clinical trial comparing intracranial stenting to medical therapy alone.

Co-authors and disclosures are available in the abstract. There were no external funding sources for this study.

The American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference (ISC) is the world’s premier meeting dedicated to the science of stroke and brain health. ISC 2020 will be held February 19-21 at the Los Angeles Convention Center in California. The 2 ½-day conference features more than 1,600 compelling scientific presentations in 21 categories that emphasize basic, clinical and translational science for health care professionals and researchers. These science and other clinical presentations will provide attendees with a better understanding of stroke and brain health to help improve prevention, treatment and outcomes for the more than 800,000 Americans who have a stroke each year. Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the U.S. Worldwide, cerebrovascular accidents (stroke) are the second leading cause of death and the third leading cause of disability, according to the World Health Organization. Engage in the International Stroke Conference on social media via #ISC20.


About the American Stroke Association
The American Stroke Association is a relentless force for a world with fewer strokes and longer, healthier lives. We team with millions of volunteers and donors to ensure equitable health and stroke care in all communities. We work to prevent, treat and beat stroke by funding innovative research, fighting for the public’s health, and providing lifesaving resources. The Dallas-based association was created in 1998 as a division of the American Heart Association.

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