Brain imaging shows how nonverbal children with autism have slower response to sounds

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Brain imaging shows how nonverbal children with autism have slower response to sounds

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style | September 20, 2019 MRI

"Since MEG is less invasive and does not expose the child to radiation, it can be less demanding than other imaging methods. We felt like we were in a better position to use this technology to study this population of children," said Timothy Roberts, PhD, Vice-chair of Research for the Department of Radiology and the Oberkircher Family Endowed Chair in Pediatric Radiology, director of the Lurie Family Foundations MEG Imaging Center at CHOP and first author of the study.

A total of 105 patients were enrolled in the study (16 minimally verbal or nonverbal with autism, 55 verbal with autism, and 34 neurotypical patients to serve as a control). The researchers found that minimally verbal or nonverbal participants had delayed responses to simple auditory tones, and longer times to response were associated with poorer communication skills as measured by a standardized questionnaire completed by parents.

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Based on these findings, the authors said this study indicated that longer latency delays were associated with poorer language ability. Additionally, the findings suggest that measuring brain activity in the auditory cortex could serve as important objective markers for how these patients respond to sound.

"Given their association with language activity, we believe these measurements of response time have both prognostic and treatment ramifications," Kuschner said. "It would be exciting if down the road we could use these MEG markers to understand the course of language development or personalize which treatment approach might be best for a particular child."


About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 564-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents.

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