DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Pediatrics
SEARCH
Endroit courant :
>
> This Story


Ouverture ou Registre to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Risk Management Homepage

Anthem pays HHS $16 million over 'largest health data breach in US history' Promises 'major corrective action' after info exposed on 79 million people

Cybersecurity threats top ECRI's list of health technology hazards for second year There were 77 healthcare data breaches in first three months of 2018

GE teams with CHI Franciscan Health to implement AI-powered command center Fifth health system to incorporate this technology

Anatomy of a hospital cybersecurity attack Tips for detecting, responding to, and preventing attacks at your facility

Study finds managerial discretion drives voluntary medical device recalls Are physicians being relied on to screen out defective products?

Early discharge associated with better outcomes after TAVR Researchers find that discharging patients within 72 hours yields clinical benefits

Physicians should be granted immunity to malpractice lawsuits, says study Recorded a 13 percent decline in adverse events over four years

Higher radiation dose isn't the best option for prostate cancer Study shows it doesn't affect patient survival rate

Study of the 2016 Summer Olympic Games sheds light on imaging utilization rates May help plan imaging services for future events

ACC outlines how to prevent cardiac device hacking in new paper Mitigating risk to pacemakers and ICDs

AAPM and ACR extinguish concerns regarding radioactive material in cremated bodies

par Thomas Dworetzky , Contributing Reporter
Radiation treatments prior to death may make a patient's body a little too hot to handle with regular crematorium procedures – and more attention needs to be paid to the issue of the proper management of such remains.

The matter came to light in a recent JAMA research letter, which reviewed the 2017 case of a cancer patient who had received radioactive treatment at the Mayo Clinic in Arizona prior to his death, and whose cremation led to contamination of the crematorium.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

THE (LEADER) IN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1982. SALES-SERVICE-REPAIR

Special-Pricing Available on Medical Displays, Patient Monitors, Recorders, Printers, Media, Ultrasound Machines, and Cameras.This includes Top Brands such as SONY, BARCO, NDS, NEC, LG, EDAN, EIZO, ELO, FSN, PANASONIC, MITSUBISHI, OLYMPUS, & WIDE.



"It's not the second coming of Chernobyl or Fukushima, but it's unwanted, unnecessary radiation," Kevin Nelson, the radiation safety officer at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and one of the research letter's authors told The Arizona Republic.

The JAMA letter and subsequent publicity – even alarm – surrounding it requires perspective, advised a statement from The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the American College of Radiology (ACR).

It is important to remember several key points regarding the potential dangers, they advised, including:

  • Radioactive materials are used routinely in medical practice to improve human health.

  • The risk of harm to the crematorium operator is so small that it cannot be measured.

  • Consensus guidelines from national (CDC and DOE) and international radiation protection and public health organizations provide clear guidance on how to identify radioactivity in patient remains and appropriately deal with the body of the decedent.

  • Healthcare providers who administer radioactive material must have a designated Radiation Safety Officer whose credentials meet criteria established by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These individuals are often certified medical physicists or health physicists.

  • The low-cost best practice of installing a simple radiation detector in hospital morgues, funeral homes and crematoriums would quickly alert staff to the presence of radioactivity. A certified medical physicist or health physicist has the expertise to determine when the measured radiation levels will have decreased to a level where it is safe to release the body to coroners, medical examiners, or mortuary services.

The research letter called the after-death challenge from radiopharmaceuticals “unique and often overlooked,” noting that "cremating an exposed patient volatilizes the radiopharmaceutical, which can then be inhaled by workers (or released into the adjacent community) and result in greater exposure than from a living patient."
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 >>

Risk Management Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

La publicité d'email
Développez la notoriété de votre marque
Enchères + Ventes Privées
Obtenir le meilleur prix
Acheter des équipement / pièces
Trouver le meilleur prix
Infos du jour
Lire Les dernières nouvelles
Annuaire
Consulter tous les utilisateurs DOTmed
Éthique concernant DOTmed
Voir notre programme d'éthique
L'or partie le programme de fournisseur
Recevoir des demandes PH
Programme de marchand de service d'or
Recevoir des demandes
Fournisseurs de soins de santé
Voir tous les outils des HCP (abréviation pour les professionnels de la santé)
Jobs/Formation
Trouver / combler un poste
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Obtenir des devis de pièces
Voir les utilisateurs récemment certifiés
Voir les utilisateurs récemment certifiés
Récemment évalué sur DOTmed
Voir les utilisateurs récemment certifiés
Central de location
Louer de l’équipement à moindre prix
Vendre des équipements / pièces
Obtenir le maximum d'argent
Service Technicians Forum
Trouver de l'aide et des conseils
Simple demande de propositions
Obtenir des devis pour des appareils
Expo Virtuelle
Trouver des services d'appareils
L'Access et l'utilisation de cet emplacement est sujet aux modalités et aux conditions du notre de nos MENTIONS LEGALES & DONNEES PERSONELLES
Propriété de et classe des propriétaires DOTmedà .com, inc. Copyright ©2001-2019 DOTmed.com, Inc.
TOUS DROITS RÉSERVÉS