DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Endroit courant :
>
> This Story


Ouverture ou Registre to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

Business Affairs Homepage

Varian acquires Noona Healthcare Gains mobile service app that captures PROs

Philly leads US cities in need of radiologists Shortages continue to leave radiologists in high demand

Siemens Healthineers holds grand opening of new Erlangen HQ Continuing its 140 year presence in the city

Does GE CEO move cast doubt on healthcare spinoff? Industry analysts weigh in on how this could change the game plan

Mass imaging exam cancellations by VA puts veterans lives at risk Medically needed scans reportedly removed from schedule to reduce backlog

Healthcare has a serious problem with wasted spending How supply chain can hold the key to more efficient hospital finances

Hologic to acquire Focal Therapeutics for $125 million Furthering its expansion into the breast conservation surgery market

GE CEO Flannery is out as Culp Jr. named chairman and CEO The latest shake-up in a year full of transitions

China tariffs now hit $4.7 billion worth of U.S. medical devices AdvaMed warns that things could get worse before they get better

Samsung in talks with Nipro for medical device division sale May sharpen focus on diagnostic imaging solutions

Study finds majority of U.S. radiologists practice as generalists

par John W. Mitchell , Senior Correspondent
Until recently, the makeup of the U.S. radiology workforce was, at best, an educated guess. But a just-published study online by Radiology using insurance claims data has put a specific number on practice patterns: some 55.3 percent of U.S. radiologists practice predominantly as generalists.

“There’s a lack of objective data about the subspecialization of the national radiologist workforce. It’s largely been done with surveys and opinion, with no consistent definition of what is a generalist or a subspecialist,” Andrew B. Rosenkrantz, M.D., professor, director of Health Policy at New York University Langone Health, and one of the researchers, told HCB News. “So, we did this to take a transparent, reproducible and objective approach.”

Story Continues Below Advertisement

RaySafe helps you avoid unnecessary radiation

RaySafe solutions are designed to minimize the need for user interaction, bringing unprecedented simplicity & usability to the X-ray room. We're committed to establishing a radiation safety culture wherever technicians & medical staff encounter radiation.



According to Rosenkrantz, there has been as an emphasis in recent years on how more radiologists are becoming subspecialists, but the study found a little more than half of radiologists are generalists. According to the study, a generalist was defined as a radiologist who dedicated less than 36 percent of their practice to any one subspecialty.

The study findings were based on an analysis of 33,090 radiologists who billed for professional services between 2012 and 2014. In the database, the radiologists relied on a validated classification system to assign relative value units (RVUs) to seven subspecialties. Radiologists who billed more than half of their work in subspecialty areas were defined as subspecialists.

“We can’t lose sight of the preponderance of generalist radiologists. They are still important and vital in today’s radiologist workforce market,” said Rosenkrantz. ”I think radiologists in training can be aware of these findings. We highlighted a large number of trends related to the radiologist workforce that, to our knowledge, have not been previously highlighted.”

The study found that academic status, group practice size, geographic location of a practice and years in practice can determine which career track a radiologist follows. For example, the study revealed that nuclear medicine physicians tend to have more years in practice, while cardiac-thoracic imaging specialists tend to specialize earlier in their careers.

The six leading radiology subspecialties, according to the billing data, are neuroradiology, breast, abdominal, vascular and interventional, musculoskeletal and nuclear medicine.

“Some of (the findings) may challenge previously held views, as we’ve built this as a model to use claims data to look at radiologists,” said Rosenkrantz.

Back to HCB News
  Pages: 1

Business Affairs Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Publicité
Développez la notoriété de votre marque
Enchères + Ventes Privées
Obtenir le meilleur prix
Acheter des équipement / pièces
Trouver le meilleur prix
Infos du jour
Lire Les dernières nouvelles
Annuaire
Consulter tous les utilisateurs DOTmed
Éthique concernant DOTmed
Voir notre programme d'éthique
L'or partie le programme de fournisseur
Recevoir des demandes PH
Programme de marchand de service d'or
Recevoir des demandes
Fournisseurs de soins de santé
Voir tous les outils des HCP (abréviation pour les professionnels de la santé)
Les travaux/Formation
Trouver / combler un poste
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Obtenir des devis de pièces
Certification Récentes
Voir les utilisateurs récemment certifiés
Evaluation Récentes
Voir les utilisateurs récemment certifiés
Central de location
Louer de l’équipement à moindre prix
Vendre des équipements / pièces
Obtenir le maximum d'argent
Service le forum de techniciens
Trouver de l'aide et des conseils
Simple demande de propositions
Obtenir des devis pour des appareils
Expo Virtuelle
Trouver des services d'appareils
L'Access et l'utilisation de cet emplacement est sujet aux modalités et aux conditions du notre de nos MENTIONS LEGALES & DONNEES PERSONELLES
Propriété de et classe des propriétaires DOTmedà .com, inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
TOUS DROITS RÉSERVÉS